August 29, 2014

gettingahealthybody:

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

RESPECT.

August 29, 2014

loltias:

sorry to ruin such a lovely day, but I’m going to bring up the Grind since it’s August.

every year, the faroe islands kill thousands of endangered long-finned pilot whales for sport. it is considered a tradition that goes back to the 1500s and is carried out still today. it is called The Grind.

some argue ruining a tradition so old is immoral and disrespectful to those living there, but considering the endangerment of these animals and the brutality that takes place, it should be easy to say that a stop needs to be put to this.

long-finned pilot whales travel in nearby, warmer waters to give birth. those that take part in The Grind could care less that they are slaughtering, torturing, and ripping out fetuses from pregnant whales. 

what happens to the meat? some of it is divided up among the locals, yet most of it is left to rot on the beach. the meat is also quite poisonous due to pollutants in the water and is not considered okay for consumption.

WARNING: Gruesome Description

So how does an entire community manage to go out and kill pilot whales? Do they use harpoons like Japanese whalers, or large boats? No.

Boats go out to herd up the whales who are usually far from the shore area. They push them towards the shore in a similar way the infamous Taiji Cove does; by creating loud noises and vibrations in the water to get the whales in the direction they want. the whales are chased to shore, where they become stranded and trapped. Those that are not lead to shore are hooked near the blowhole and dragged.

then the community begins the slaughter. those that are stranded are stabbed with knives. Their veins and arteries are cut to prevent blood from reaching their heads. The process is not only gruesome and gory, but long. it can take 30 seconds to 5 minutes for a pilot whale to die. not only do the individual whales face this ordeal, but they are surrounded by family going through the same thing and are aware of everything that happens to them. 

children take part in this, often getting help from parents to slaughter the whales. they pose on dead carcasses for pictures and smile. others rip out the fetuses of the whales or continue mutilating them for enjoyment. 

This event is technically illegal, considering the species most often killed is endangered. However, the Faroese government allows it. 

Sea Shepherd is beginning to take part in ending it. They are going out this year to try and prevent the Grind from happening and bringing awareness to those performing the actions to understand that the cetaceans they are killing are fully aware of themselves, their family, and have the same emotions as humans and perhaps more. 

if you’d like to help, please sign petitions (xxx) or support Sea Shepherd and other organizations to help bring this to an end.

This year, luckily, the presence of Sea Shepherd prevented the whaling from occurring. No whales have been killed this year.

(via pale-as-can-be)

August 29, 2014
newyorker:

Margaret  Talbot on the cover of a fiftieth-anniversary edition of Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”:

“Dahl’s young characters always have agency; their magic powers or ingenious schemes—what their adult overlords consider misbehavior—always save the day. The Modern Classics cover has not a whiff of this validation of childish imagination; instead, it seems to imply a deviant adult audience.”

newyorker:

Margaret  Talbot on the cover of a fiftieth-anniversary edition of Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”:

“Dahl’s young characters always have agency; their magic powers or ingenious schemes—what their adult overlords consider misbehavior—always save the day. The Modern Classics cover has not a whiff of this validation of childish imagination; instead, it seems to imply a deviant adult audience.”

(Source: newyorker.com)

3:43pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZdUJYs1PWQqDk
  
Filed under: lit the New Yorker 
August 28, 2014
Why #WeNeedDiverseBooks

becauseiamawoman:

image

By: Rachel L.

#WeNeedDiverseBooks is more than just a hashtag- it’s a movement to improve the heavily criticized lack of diversity within the book world.With little variation in characters, people online and elsewhere have gone back and forth about whether…

(via youdontlooklikeafeminist)

11:33am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZdUJYs1PQMBTP
  
Filed under: lit 
August 27, 2014

mediamattersforamerica:

Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  

Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”

On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 

What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 

If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues. 

(via etucru)

August 27, 2014

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $400,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

(via bathsabbath)

August 27, 2014
washingtonpost:

Disney filed a patent for “blimp-sized” puppets controlled by drones.

washingtonpost:

Disney filed a patent for “blimp-sized” puppets controlled by drones.

August 27, 2014

newyorker:

The International Center of Photography, in a joint effort with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, now offers digital access to its Roman Vishniac archive. Take a look at some of his work, which documents Eastern European Jewish life between 1935 and 1938.

Top: An elder of the village, Vysni Apsa, Carpathian Ruthenia, c. 1935–38. Bottom: Students sharing books in heder, Brod, c. 1935–38. Photographs © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

(Source: newyorker.com)

August 27, 2014
Who's In The Office? The American Workday In One Graph : Planet Money : NPR

11:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZdUJYs1POCQ5-
Filed under: work america npr 
August 27, 2014
If we are all journalists now, what happens to the privileges journalists used to claim?

futurejournalismproject:

Via Index on Censorship:

We are used to telling ourselves by now that journalism is a manifestation of a human right — that of free expression. Smartphones, cheap recording equipment, and free access to social media and blogging platforms have revolutionised journalism; the means of production have fallen into the hands of the many.

This is a good thing. The more information we have on events, surely the better. But one question does arise: if we are all journalists now, what happens to the privileges journalists used to claim?

Official press identification in the UK states that the holder is recognised by police as a “bona fide newsgatherer”. As statements of status go, it seems a paltry thing. But it does imply that some exception must be made for the bearer. The recognised journalist, it is suggested, should be free to roam a scene unmolested. One can ask questions and reasonably expect an answer. One can wield a video or audio device and not have it confiscated. One can talk to whoever one wants, without fear of recrimination.

That, at least, is the theory. But in Britain, the US and elsewhere, the practice has been changing. Whether during periods of unrest or after, police have shown a disregard for the integrity of journalists’ work. The actions of police in Ferguson have merely been part of a pattern.

FJP: As of August 22, 17 reporters had been arrested in Ferguson.