April 22, 2014

recoveryisbeautiful:

What Is Bipolar Disorder?

Living with Bipolar Disorder

Coping with Mania

Coping with Depression

Supporting Someone with Bipolar Disorder

                  - Helping a Loved One Manage a Manic Episode
                  - 10 Ways to Show Love to Someone with Depression

 Other

                  - Dealing Effectively

                 - Understanding Bipolar and Recovery
                 - Coping Strategies

Be sure to go to my RESOURCES page for more informational and support websites on bipolar disorder as well as worksheets to help you cope or track your mood. This page will be updated regularly and worksheet pages will be continuously added.

(via hercules-corona)

April 22, 2014
"In the world of Genesis, which, in its opening chapters, seems fairly remote from ours—a world of slick-talking snakes, cherubs with flaming swords, and guys who live to be eight hundred years old—the ark gives us something pragmatic, something with worldly dimensions. In other words, some literary realism."

Avi Steinberg on why we love to build arks: http://nyr.kr/1muF9iW (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

April 22, 2014
The Neglected Suicide Epidemic : The New Yorker

April 22, 2014
popchartlab:

Belly up to our latest print: The Distinguished Drinkeries of NYC, a color-coded metropolitan mapping of over 200 watering holes across three boroughs.
Even better, it’s 20% off for the next 24 hours! Think of it as a Happy 24-Hours.

popchartlab:

Belly up to our latest print: The Distinguished Drinkeries of NYC, a color-coded metropolitan mapping of over 200 watering holes across three boroughs.

Even better, it’s 20% off for the next 24 hours! Think of it as a Happy 24-Hours.

April 22, 2014
Death and Anger on Everest

newyorker:

Jon Krakauer reflects on the Mount Everest avalanche, the worst climbing accident in the mountain’s history, and explores why the risk remains so great for Sherpas: http://nyr.kr/1mxka1k

Photograph by Niranjan Shrestha/AP.

(Source: newyorker.com)

April 22, 2014

unfriendlybambi:

f-emasculata:

REALLY just wanna take this chance to remind the people who follow me to not kill/trap opossums if they’re in your yard, and do not call animal control! Seriously.

  1. Opossums are literally 100% BIOLOGICALLY INCAPABLE of carrying rabies. Their body temperature is too cool to incubate it properly.
  2. Opossums are actually quite gentle and NOCTURNAL, so if they’re roaming, they’ve probably gotten lost, been injured, and are looking for a place to hide.
  3. Young opossums tend to try to climb into garbage cans when they’re starving. This is because THEY ARE LITERALLY STARVING. Don’t fucking shoot them or hit them with things because you wanna be some fucking macho top-of-the-food-chain cocksucker.
  4. Mama possums are amazing mothers and if you encounter an “aggressive” opossum, it’s probably because she’s got babies hanging off her nipple and she’s freaking out. They’re clumsy. Sometimes they don’t hear you coming and  you catch each other off guard.
  5. Wanna lure an opossum off of your property? You can set up a box with some greens and cat kibble in it, hide it well, and lure them out that way. They’re actually quite harmless and keep other predators away. they eat lotsa gross stuff.
  6. Opossum mamas who get hit by cars often still have their helpless babies attached to them. Possums get a bad rep and people say they are “the dumbest animal”, but they are incredible creatures who have been around since the days of fucking dinosaurs so treat them well, okay?

Aww!!!

(Source: micromys, via feverishpoptart)

April 22, 2014
fotojournalismus:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry
How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? View the interactive
(via guardian)

fotojournalismus:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry

How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? View the interactive

(via guardian)

(Source: theguardian.com)

April 21, 2014
joachimmurat:

gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.

SAVE THE GODDAMN BIG KITTIES

joachimmurat:

gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.

SAVE THE GODDAMN BIG KITTIES

(Source: , via songsofthesilent)

April 21, 2014
latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)
After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.
The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.
Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)

After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.

The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.

Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

April 21, 2014
Girls who get 'caught in a bad romance' risk more than just their broken hearts