August 27, 2014
If we are all journalists now, what happens to the privileges journalists used to claim?

futurejournalismproject:

Via Index on Censorship:

We are used to telling ourselves by now that journalism is a manifestation of a human right — that of free expression. Smartphones, cheap recording equipment, and free access to social media and blogging platforms have revolutionised journalism; the means of production have fallen into the hands of the many.

This is a good thing. The more information we have on events, surely the better. But one question does arise: if we are all journalists now, what happens to the privileges journalists used to claim?

Official press identification in the UK states that the holder is recognised by police as a “bona fide newsgatherer”. As statements of status go, it seems a paltry thing. But it does imply that some exception must be made for the bearer. The recognised journalist, it is suggested, should be free to roam a scene unmolested. One can ask questions and reasonably expect an answer. One can wield a video or audio device and not have it confiscated. One can talk to whoever one wants, without fear of recrimination.

That, at least, is the theory. But in Britain, the US and elsewhere, the practice has been changing. Whether during periods of unrest or after, police have shown a disregard for the integrity of journalists’ work. The actions of police in Ferguson have merely been part of a pattern.

FJP: As of August 22, 17 reporters had been arrested in Ferguson. 

August 26, 2014
Tracking Happiness

lifestyleoftheunemployed:

I was recently listening to a podcast on Happiness (highly recommend it). One of the people interview was named Matt Killingsworth. Matt is getting his doctorate from Harvard. In 2009, he developed an app called Track Your Happiness to study what makes people happy. The app sends you a…

August 26, 2014
6 Ways to Win Any Argument | Psychology Today

August 26, 2014
The Standup Life

newyorker:

image

Over the past month, we’ve been sharing collections of classic stories from the archive. This week, we turn to comedy. Read Julia Hecht’s story about her friendship with the experimental comedian Andy Kaufman, Zoe Heller’s Profile of the legendary comedian Don Rickles, and more.

Illustration by Victor Kerlow

(Source: newyorker.com)

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Filed under: lit 
August 25, 2014
I Have a Character Issue - NYTimes.com

11:55pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZdUJYs1PDsRPK
Filed under: nytimes bb anna gunn 
August 25, 2014
Psych2go – Mindbite: Articles Sure to Get You Thinking

(Source: psych2go)

August 25, 2014
Personality: What Is It?

(Source: psych2go)

August 25, 2014
currentsinbiology:

compoundchem:

The second graphic in the ‘Undeserved Reputations’ series looks at Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, and the myths surrounding it. You can see a larger version of the graphic and read more here: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-msgThere’s also a great ACS Reactions video on the subject here: http://bit.ly/MSGreactions

All I know is that my siblings and I could not stop laughing after eating Chinese food. We would practically fall out of the car in hysterics. If not the MSG, what was that all about?

currentsinbiology:

compoundchem:

The second graphic in the ‘Undeserved Reputations’ series looks at Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, and the myths surrounding it. 

You can see a larger version of the graphic and read more here: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-msg

There’s also a great ACS Reactions video on the subject here: http://bit.ly/MSGreactions

All I know is that my siblings and I could not stop laughing after eating Chinese food. We would practically fall out of the car in hysterics. If not the MSG, what was that all about?

10:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZdUJYs1PDP0S1
  
Filed under: food msg 
August 25, 2014

micdotcom:

55 Twitter photos from space that will fill you with ethereal wonder

Reid Wiseman is a national treasure.

Follow micdotcom 

(via grapegatsby)

August 25, 2014

majiinboo:

arabellesicardi:

Here is a side by side comparison of how The New York Times has profiled Michael Brown — an 18 year old black boy gunned down by police — and how they profiled Ted Bundy, one of the most prolific serial killers of all time. 

Source for Brown, Source for Bundy.

character assassination 

(via blazeberg)